Showing posts with label 90s. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 90s. Show all posts

This Month in YesterYear History - December

Monday, November 28, 2022

I can't believe it's time for December already!  Let's get on with another edition of  "This Month in YesterYear History!" 
In this series, we take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of popular culture from the past 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!   



Below, you'll find a little time capsule of what was significant in our lives during those days.  Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses of the past, you'll begin to remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time.  

That's why I post to this site, after all!

So, let's get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to Twenty, Twenty Five, and Thirty years ago!

This Month in YesterYear History - November

Monday, November 7, 2022

Halloween quickly came and went, and as we enter the post-holiday doldrums, I'll be taking most of the month off.  We have a big family vacation coming up to see Uncle Mickey and Aunt Minnie, so most of the month will be Retro RePosts of some fun Thanksgiving content.  I promise a new "Thanksgiving On..." classic sitcom article this year, though.  Be on the lookout for that, and if you would, please come back and check out the RePosts, too!


Let's review the Novembers of our past with another edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"  


Please CLICK HERE to read last month's feature if you missed it!


In this series, we take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of popular culture from the past 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!   



Below, you'll find a little time capsule of what was significant in our lives during those days.  Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses of the past, you'll begin to remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  

That's why I post to this site, after all!

So, let's get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to Twenty, Twenty Five, and Thirty years ago!

This Month In YesterYear History - October

Monday, September 26, 2022

October is finally upon us!  


Ok, I know I'm posting this at the end of September, but I need every available Monday and Friday for our Halloween 2022 content! On Monday, you'll find an original post or article, and on Friday, I'll be highlighting some past articles you may have missed, so please, check them out!  


By the way, if you use a desktop, you'll notice on the right side of the screen, I've added links to view this Halloween's T.V. Listings for AMC FrightFest, Freeform's 31 Nights of Halloween, and a Streaming Sampler List. If you're using a phone or tablet, you'll have to scroll down to the bottom to find it.  


Let's review the Octobers of our past with another edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"  


Please CLICK HERE to read last month's feature if you missed it!


In this series, we take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of popular culture from the past 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!   



Below, you'll find a little time capsule of what was significant in our lives during those days.  Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses of the past, you'll begin to remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  

That's why I post to this site, after all!

So, let's get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back Twenty, Twenty Five, and Thirty years ago!

Retro Scans: TV Guide 1996 Fall TV Preview

Monday, September 12, 2022

Fall may not have officially started yet, but with Labor Day and the unofficial end to summer firmly in our rearview mirror, many of us are thinking of cooler weather and our favorite fall activities.

For the longest time, Fall, and specifically September, often meant a new slate of TV shows and an exciting amount of new programming.  

Growing up in the 90s, I can remember the excitement of the new crop of television programs and the immense amount of advertising these broadcasting companies put into them.  


For me, diving into a fresh Fall television lineup was akin to waiting to see who the New York Rangers would trade on Deadline Day or the excitement of the wheeling and dealing during Silly Season in NASCAR.  

As I poured over the TV listings, it was always exciting to ask myself questions like which of the new series would flop and get canceled.  Who would survive until the end of the season?  Will they get renewed?  Which new show will be the next big thing and launch the actors into megastardom?   

Today... not so much.  There is much less risk with new series and often networks will run the course with a sure thing or cancel it before production.  

That's not just for television, too.  Sports free agent markets have changed so much in recent years thanks to large contracts, corporate input, and salary caps.  Things don't just seem as much fun as they once were.

I can write paragraphs about how streaming services have diversified the viewing landscape.  I could also go on about the lack of "seasons" on television anymore, but that's an entirely different discussion for another time.

As we knew it back then, the fall schedule consisted of new television series paired with returning favorites packaged into a giant media frenzy and advertising campaign launched at the end of August.  The shows would begin their season in September and run through December, taking a hiatus during the holiday weeks when viewership declines.   A "midseason" premier would occur in January and historically run through mid to late May.

Recently, several networks have staggered the new and returning shows without necessarily following the standard fall and spring schedules.  In 2008, NBC was the first to make it official, claiming they'd follow the "52-week television season" with fewer episodes than the current standard.  

For comparison, back in the 1950s, I Love Lucy aired 35 episodes from September through May.  In the 90s, Seinfeld ran 24 episodes from September through May.  But in 2022, Better Call Saul ran only 7 episodes during April and May, followed by a two-month break, before finishing the season (and series) with only 6 more episodes. 

This reduced number of episodes leads to changes in presentation and storytelling, of course.  One would argue that the shows are much more like "mini-films" these days, and you'd be right to some extent.  Rising production costs, increased actor salaries, and reduced advertising budgets created by declining audiences have led to the need to shorten television seasons.  

The audience's desire to binge-watch a series on a streaming platform also reduces the number of episodes per season.  When I Love Lucy aired 35 episodes in a single season, they did so by producing them one week at a time.  When a series is placed on streaming platforms to be watched all at once, all episodes must be filmed all at once, requiring a more extended production schedule.  Many streaming platforms are now following Disney Plus' lead and are getting away from the Netflix style of "dropping an entire season at once" and returning to the standard weekly episodic model.  

You can also consider audience attention span and viewing fatigue as contributing factors.  Today's viewers need a constant "new-ness"; otherwise, a show will wear out quickly.  Today's audience has a more discerning palate, it seems.  

Speaking of advertising budgets, did you know the original reason that the Fall Premier season is a big deal is that it was created to help automobile manufacturers promote the new car lineup for the coming year?   

The more you know... (cue the shooting star). 

In the 90s, an old Seinfeld rerun could earn 20 million viewers.  Today, a "hit" streaming show on Netflix or Amazon may be considered a "massive success" with only a few hundred thousand views, as long as it gets social media buzz to drum up online ad sales.  

With limited time this week, and after working on my "Retro Museum" at home, I came across a copy of an old TV Guide from 1996 I had aquired many years ago that highlighted the new Fall Season.  

Some of the shows featured in the following pages I remember fondly.  Some I had long forgotten, and some I don't remember whatsoever.  I scanned some excerpts, along with a handful of fun advertisements that piqued my interest.  

Look through the scans below and enjoy your own stroll down memory lane.  Do you remember any of these shows?  Did you watch any of them faithfully, only to be disappointed when they were canceled?  

Let me know in the comments section, or drop me a line!  

You can find the "Drop Me a Line" box on the right side of your screen if you are using a laptop or desktop computer.  You can find it on a tablet or phone below the posts towards the bottom of the page.  

Or, you can always just click on the little envelope in the top right corner and send me an email!  

This Month in YesterYear History - September

Monday, September 5, 2022

Well, our YesterYear Summer of 2022 has come and gone, Labor Day has passed us by, and it's already September!  Where has the time gone?  Let's review the Septembers of our past with another new edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"   

In this series, we take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of popular culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    


Cobbling together information from various websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in our lives during those days.   Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  

That's why I post to this site, after all!

So, let's get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back Twenty, Twenty Five, and Thirty years ago!

This Month In YesterYear History - August

Monday, August 1, 2022

It's already August and a new month brings a new edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"   

Please CLICK HERE to read last month's feature if you missed it!  

In this series, we'll take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of pop culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    



Using a conglomeration of websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in life during those days.   

Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  That's what this site is all about, after all!

So, get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to 20, 25, and 30 years ago!

Foods from YesterYear: Crystal Pepsi

Monday, July 25, 2022

"It could have been more than just a novelty."
-David Novak, creator of Crystal Pepsi

I'm gonna make a giant stretch here since it's hard to connect this topic directly to summertime, but I'll just say... who doesn't like a nice cold refreshing glass of soda on a hot summer evening?  

There!  Now it's connected to summertime and fits perfectly into the YesterYear Summer of 2022!  See how I did that?  I'm a professional.  I was ova there... now I'm ova here.  Thank you, Mr. Dice Clay.  I will forever use that line.

The 90s was a great time.  Summer in the 90s was even better.  During the 90s, we were introduced to many new and exciting products.  Back then, large corporations were more willing to take a chance without having everything market tested or viewed from a thousand different angles by lawyers, subject experts, and consultants, only to produce a watered-down version of what everyone wanted anyway.  

In the 90s, they took chances and frequently succeeded. Unfortunately, there were just as often just as many failures.


Crystal Pepsi was supposed to become a billion-dollar idea.  Instead, it wound up a colossal failure.  Starting with a smashingly successful Superbowl commercial featuring Van Halen, Crystal Pepsi debuted with much fanfare.  Less than a year after it hit store shelves, the soft drink was pulled from circulation.  It became a bit of a laughingstock that was later dubbed as one of the biggest product failures ever by TIME Magazine.  

The rise and fall of Crystal Pepsi has always been fascinating to me.  As a kid, I remember seeing Crystal Pepsi in stores with signs, cardboard standees, and all other sorts of advertising a new product tends to get.  In the beginning of it's run, Crystal Pepsi was advertised during nearly every commercial break on television.  It may just be my imagination, but I can remember Mom and Dad had it in the fridge once or twice, too.  

Then, suddenly it disappeared.

When it re-emerged two decades later, my wife and I went on the hunt.  It was quite a happy day when she was doing our weekly grocery shopping and found a (literal) barrel full of them at the check-out line.  She grabbed a handful, and we sampled one the minute she got home.  It tasted like I remembered, or at least what I thought I remembered it tasting like, anyway.  We enjoyed the rest of the bottles over the next week or so, and I've saved one in my nostalgia museum.  

So, how did this clear soda come about and what exactly happened that made it go away so quickly?  

Let's take another deep dive as we look at a Food from YesterYear:  Crystal Pepsi!

25 Things That Make a 90s Kid Think of Summer

Monday, July 18, 2022

I frequently get a little prickly when I hear the 90s are old-fashioned or a long time ago.  It feels like something 5 years ago, but to my horror, the 90s were as far back as THIRTY-TWO years ago!  If Back to the Future was made today, instead of making the jump from 1985 to 1965 (which seemed like two different worlds), Marty Mcfly would be time-traveling from 2022 to 1992!  It would definitely be considered two other worlds today, too.  Talk about crazy!  

I'm older than I feel, although some days I'm a little stiffer and slower than I'd like to be.  My wife and I use a line from the DuckTales reboot "It's because you're so old and moving is so hard."  I'm 38, but I feel like I'm still a 25-year-old, which is a good thing... I think.  I say all that to not sound like an oldtimer with my following statement.  

Kids today are missing out because summertime in the 90s will never be beat.  

Everything from movies or music, pop culture, snacks, tv shows, and everyday activities were much better back then.  Let's just state the obvious, though.  There was one thing that made all of our summer shenanigans possible that wouldn't fly today.  

We weren't supervised as much as kids today are and got away with a lot more.  

We also had to be creative to entertain ourselves rather than be entertained by our parents.

It wasn't because our parents were neglectful; it was just a different time.  We enjoyed a freedom and security that no longer exists.  We spent hours playing outside and wouldn't come home until our parents yelled for dinner.  Then we'd be back out on the streets until dark.  Nobody worried when they didn't see us because they knew the neighbors and where we were all hanging out.

Peak 90s Summer Attire

I also spent a lot of time indoors, watching reruns on daytime television and playing with my action figures.  I created whole universes and storylines that lasted the entire summer.  I made wrestling leagues and fantasy sports leagues and played out the seasons in my head.  When we got our first computer and Prodigy internet, I'd spend hours researching pro wrestling rumors and storylines, making clipart, and attempting to beat that frustrating Windows MineSweeper game.

When we weren't indoors, my brother and I rode bikes in the street with the neighborhood kids.  If not, we'd be in our pool in the backyard, swimming until we turned to prunes.  We didn't have to worry about dropping our cellphones into the pool because they didn't exist yet.  When our friends wanted to talk, they'd call the house and ask our parents if we were there.  If not, they walked over and rang the doorbell.  

Looking back, the best thing about all of the summers of the 1990s was no social media to distract (or document) us.  We were carefree, and there was no evidence left behind.  And to be honest, we really didn't get into trouble.  We mainly did what we wanted to do, when, and how we wanted to do it.  We embraced summer in a way that is no longer possible due to stranger danger and whatnot.  

Maybe we know more now and just got lucky back then, I don't know.  Whatever the case, we were the last generation of kids to experience the true freedom of summer before technology took over and the world got more complicated and less safe.  

Perhaps, as the oldtimers say, those were the "good old days."  

Enough complaining, let's get down to my list of 25 things that will remind you of summer in the 90s!

This Month in YesterYear History - July

Monday, July 11, 2022

Welcome to July!  A new month brings a new edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"   

Please CLICK HERE to read last month's feature if you missed it!  

In this series, we'll take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of pop culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    



Using film website Box Office Mojo, The Billboard Top 40 music list, and a conglomeration of television rating websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in life during those days.   

Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  That's what this site is all about, after all!

So, get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to 20, 25, and 30 years ago!

Saved By The Bell's Summer at the Malibu Sands Beach Club

Monday, June 20, 2022

Like many other children of the 80s or 90s, I grew up watching Saved by the Bell.  I previously wrote an article about something that has always puzzled some fans of the show, titled "Where Did Jessie and Kelly Go?"  I'm pretty proud of the article, as it's something I always wanted to get to the bottom of, and I hope you'll please CLICK HERE to read it.

When I was growing up, Saved by the Bell frequently ran in syndication, both during mornings before school or in the afternoons afterward.  I'd often get up earlier than needed and catch an episode or two before heading for the school bus.  My Mom bought me the Saved by the Bell board game, and while it was definitely made for girls, my friends and I still enjoyed playing it to the point that I still have it today.

Of all my favorite television shows, I've found that my favorite episodes involve travel, or at the very least, different scenery.  For example, on I Love Lucy, my favorite episodes are the season from Lucy and Ricky's trip to Hollywood.  On Saved by the Bell, my favorites have always been the "beach club" episodes.    


For those unfamiliar with Saved by the Bell, the "beach club" episodes were a six-episode story arc during Season Three, where the gang gets summer jobs working on the beach.  During those episodes, we discover that Lisa Turtle's parents are members of the exclusive Malibu Sands Beach Club and use their membership to get the kids from Bayside jobs for the summer.   

Kelly and Slater spend the summer as lifeguards while Jessie works at the reception desk.  Screech works as a busboy at the club's restaurant, while Zack starts the summer as a waiter but quickly begins to operate as the "social director."  Using his social director title quite liberally, Zack frequently lent a helping hand by applying sun tan lotion to girls on the beach before offering to take them to dinner.  (What a guy!)  Lisa Turtle, whose wealthy parents got everyone jobs, doesn't need to work and spends her summer lounging on the beach or tagging along with the group. 

The "beach club" episodes also introduced us to two fun new characters.  Character actor Ernie Sabella (CLICK HERE TO READ ALL ABOUT HIM) debuts as Mr. Leon Carosi, the owner of The Malibu Sands.  His daughter, Stacey, is a tough-talking loudmouth from "the east coast," quickly becoming a love interest for the show's main character, Zack.  Stacey is portrayed by the great Leah Remini of King of Queens fame.   

Let's continue our YesterYear Summer of '22 with a look back at the Saved by the Bell summer at the Malibu Sands Beach Club! 

This Month In YesterYear History - June

Monday, June 6, 2022

Welcome to June!  A new month brings a new edition of "This Month in YesterYear History!"   

In this series, we'll take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of pop culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    


Using film website Box Office Mojo, The Billboard Top 40 music list, and a conglomeration of television rating websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in life during those days.   

Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  That's what this site is all about, after all!

So, get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to 20, 25, and 30 years ago!

Five 90s Kid Focused Ad Jingles You'll Still Sing Along With

Monday, May 23, 2022

On the heels of last week's infomercial post, I've been thinking about the little jingles and advertisements that float around in my brain.  Maybe you were a kid during the 90s like me, or even a teen or adult already, you probably heard these constant advertisements for toys and kids' things. Even if you don't actively remember, the weird thing about jingles is that they immediately pop back into your brain. 

Sort of like if I was to ask you to sing the lyrics to an old hit song.  You probably couldn't do it on the spot.  However, if I pressed play on the music, the lyrics would immediately come back to you, and you'd be able to sing right along.


The human brain is an amazing thing.

There are a ton of these little jingles from the 90s (and before).  I picked 5 that stuck out in my brain that I repeatedly heard as a kid for this list.  I also narrowed it down to just songs or jingles from commercials, but I could have easily included the frequent slogans or other things we often heard.  Maybe you remember the bumpers before commercial breaks on ABC's Saturday morning cartoons that went "After these messages... we'll be right back!"  

Even little things take up space in my brain.  For instance, the old Blow Pops lollipop commercial that ended with a kid whispering, "Say it's from Charms!"  or the fast talking Micro Machines guy.

Without further ado, let's look back at Five 90s Kid Focused Ad Jingles!

15 Totally Awesome 90s Infomercial Products

Monday, May 16, 2022

I think it's been pretty well established that I think of the 90s as the best decade.  I think it's also been pretty well established that I watched A LOT of television during that time.  As a matter of fact, I'm pretty sure we all did.  After all, what else did we have to do?  The internet was in its infancy.  It was slow and expensive, and not everyone had in-home access yet.  So, we watched television during our free time more in the 90s than we do today.  

Back to the earliest point I can remember, cable only had a handful of channels.  It's expanded over the years, but there wasn't much to watch on television back then, even with the few channels we had.   

And to make matters worse?  We couldn't fast forward through the commercials!  

Yes, kids... without the benefits of digitized cable, DVRs, or streaming, we couldn't skip past them with the press of a button.  I remember my Dad would record something on the VCR, and we'd excitedly fast forward through the commercials. Still, recording was a pain, and the already poor television-quality was often reduced by the VHS tape that had been recorded over four hundred times already.  

Commercials were a large part of the 90s.  Some of them became pop culture moments that had the whole nation talking.  Water cooler conversation often quoted or repeated jingles and phrases from these now-iconic commercials from the 90s.  I even have an entire series on this site dedicated to some of my favorite Commercials of YesterYear, which you can check out in the Collections section (with more on the way!) 

Remember the countless Ten-Ten-Two-Twenty or Star Six-Nine phone company commercials?  The Budweiser Wasssssup guys, or Bob Wehadababyitsaboy from Geico Direct Collect Calls?  The Taco Bell dog or the Bud Ice Penguin (Doobie Doobie Doo)?  Those were significant 90s commercials that shaped popular culture, and you remember them today because of their impact from back then.  How many commercials from today will you remember in 20 years?  Not many, I'd wager.


Back in what the kids call the day, television stations would frequently not have enough programming to air a full 24 hours.  The late-night hours became home to crazy, sometimes hours long, commercials selling the strangest products and services.  Occasionally, you'd find a shortened minute-long version of these infomercials during the day that aired so frequently you could recite them in your sleep.

I remember the commercials often had crazy gimmicks that were probably illegal, if not just downright deceptive.  They'd have counters on the screen showing the number of callers or the number of items sold, much like modern-day QVC, which could not possibly have an accurate count with a commercial airing at random times.  Or the "call within the next two minutes" with a clock counting down as if you waited three minutes, you'd miss out on the deal.  If I hadn't been a naive kid who believed everything on TV, I probably would have noticed the clocks and counters were the same every time.

Sometimes, though, we'd get hours of infomercials on a lazy weekend afternoon between the morning kid's cartoons and the evening movies.  Often referred politely to as "Paid Programming," these infomercials were selling all sorts of stuff.  Food processors, golf clubs, chef-quality knives... the list goes on.  As a matter of fact, as I type this, I'm in a hotel room watching "Paid Programming" for a leaf blower.  

This paid programming on weekend afternoons was mostly on the type of channels I loved, like WPIX, FOX 5 NY, and UPN.  These stations relied heavily on syndication and films to fill up their schedule, and it was there that I watched countless hours of infomercials while waiting for the Saturday Afternoon Movie.  These channels are responsible for stuffing my mind full of catchphrases and sales pitches for junk I never knew I needed.

In the mid-2000s, infomercials and product slinging became so mainstream that pitchman Billy Mays (of OxyClean, KaBoom, and Orange Glo cleaner fame) launched a competition game show with fellow salesman Anthony Sullivan on the Discovery Channel called "Pitch Man."  This was also the period that "Slap Chop," "Snuggie Blanket," and "Sham-Wow" became very popular commercials.

Commercials slowly got out of control over the years, and as more and more people began tuning them out, companies started finding ways to catch your attention.  Eventually, they cranked up the volume during commercial breaks to keep your interest.  After a while, the volume changes were so significant that we were all getting ready to hit the mute button the second our regular programming went to break.  

In 2009, the CALM (Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation) Act was introduced and passed to marginal success.  On May 10, 2022, the author of the original CALM act, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, introduced the CALM Modernization Act, including streaming services.  That bill has not yet been passed into law.  

As our viewing habits have changed, so have commercials.  Rarely is there one that we even remember today.  Certainly, none that we discuss around whatever the modern version of the water cooler is.  There are no jingles or catchphrases, no "hey, have you seen the commercial for..." yet.  Mostly today's ads are just pharmaceuticals and other programs already on the network.  

Like many things, it just seems like it was better "back when."  That's why we nostalgia nerds love to discuss these things, and I, as the writer on this site, like to document them.  I know I've forgotten way more than I'll ever remember, and hopefully, in reading this, you too will spark a memory of where you were, or who you were with when you watched these commercials.  

Maybe you even succumbed to the advertising and purchased the product!  Did you?  Let me know in the comments, or drop me a line (on the right if you're viewing on a desktop or below on a mobile device) to let me know! 

Please click "Keep Reading" to view the list of 15 Totally Awesome 90s Infomercial Products! 

Retro Scans: 1994 Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Super Pack

Monday, May 9, 2022

Go, Go, Power Rangers!


Saban's Mighty Morphin Power Rangers brand has made quite a resurgence in the past few years.  As my generation (and the one immediately following it) fondly look back on the campy children's tv show from the 90s, all sorts of nostalgia-based merchandise have recently hit the market.  It's even become cool again for grown adults to wear Power Rangers clothing and display their toys and other collectibles.  

Believe me, there was once a time that liking Power Rangers was very not-cool for kids older than 5. 

That was also the same time I discovered and really enjoyed the show.  Like a few things I enjoyed growing up, I was probably a year or two old for it when I really got into Power Rangers.  For a while, the neighbor kid I was friends with was really into the show as well.  Then one afternoon on the school bus, I talked about looking forward to getting home to catch that day's episode.  Suddenly, he announced loud enough for the other kids on the bus to hear that Power Rangers was a stupid show for little kids.  Of course, I quickly agreed with him to save face but ran home to watch the Power Rangers anyway.  I secretly watched the show and played with my Power Rangers toys for another year, despite constant teasing from my older brother.  

The Power Ranger franchise is a live-action superhero series based on the Japanese franchise Super Sentai. Initially produced by Saban Entertainment, later Saban Brands, and today SCG Power Rangers, LLC (and its parent company Hasbro), the series takes much of its footage from the Super Sentai television series.  The first entry in the American series debuted on August 28, 1993, under the title "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers," on the Fox Kids programming block.  The show quickly launched a line of action figures and other toys made by Bandai, which generated over $6 billion in toy sales by 2001.

As of 2002, Power Rangers consists of 29 seasons on television, 3 theatrical films, and 21 different themed series (Power Rangers in Space, Power Rangers Turbo, Power Rangers Dino Charge, etc.).

The show was briefly owned by The Walt Disney Company from 2002 to 2010 when Haim Saban, the creator of the series, regained ownership.  Saban later sold the Saban Brands company to Hasbro in 2018.   

I'd say that I got into the show sometime in 1994, towards the end of the first season.  Shortly after getting hooked on the show, Tommy, the Green Ranger, turned into the White Ranger, which was a big deal with the kids in school.  I would have been in 5th grade when that major storyline took place.  I was captivated by the bright colors and cartoonish action and fight scenes which were pretty similar to the colorful world of pro wrestling that I loved so much back then.  

Next year, in the fall of 1995, I was in the 6th grade, which according to kids on the school bus, was too old to watch Power Rangers.   I kept watching regardless until one cold, rainy Saturday morning.  My Dad had hired a marine mechanic to come to look at the motor on the Ra-El, the family's fishing boat.  I was in the living room, minding my own business, watching a rerun of Power Rangers.  They were coming through the house when the mechanic stopped in the living room and looked at the television. 

After getting himself an eyeful of Mighty Morphin action, he looked at me and then my Dad.  Never mind the fact that it was raining outside, he said something along the lines of, "My kids watch this baby junk instead of playing outside, too," and the two continued on to the backyard.  

This man I never met before, nor ever saw again, was just one more person telling me I was too old to watch a show I enjoyed. 

I never watched another episode.

That's why I was highly interested in ripping into this pack of 1994's Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Super Pack of trading cards.  This pack included a handful of beautiful POGS that I found visually appealing.  The POGS were just another reminder of the time that was the wonderful 1990s.  The bright colors in the images bounced off the cards and captured my attention right away.  My interest in the show spiked again, and I watched an old episode just for old time's sake on YouTube.  

While I enjoyed it, I can finally agree with that grumpy old boat mechanic that I am too old to watch the show now.

However, I'm not too old to enjoy this trip down memory lane... and I hope you enjoy it too!  

Click "Keep Reading" to check out the entire pack of trading cards from 1994!

This Month In YesterYear History - May

Monday, May 2, 2022

Happy May!  A brand new month brings a brand new edition of This Month in YesterYear History!  Here's a fun new topic that I thought I'd try out last month and it seemed like it was well-received so I'll continue it for the foreseeable future!  Please CLICK HERE to read last month's feature in case you missed it!

Once we have a few months of these I'll create a section on the "Collections" page where you can access them all and go back in time at your leisure.

In this series, we'll take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of pop culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    


Using film website Box Office Mojo, The Billboard Top 100 music list, and a conglomeration of television rating websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in life during those days.   

Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the who, when, and where of your memories from that time period.  That's what this site is all about, after all!

So, get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to 20, 25, and 30 years ago!

Did You Know Pamela Anderson Was On Home Improvement?

Monday, April 18, 2022

In the 1990s, Pamela Anderson was everywhere.  She's most famous for starring in hit television shows like Baywatch, the cult-favorite movie Barb Wire, numerous Playboy appearances, and the infamous "tape" with her now ex-husband, Tommy Lee.  

It's been well documented here on YesterYear that I grew up loving the Tim Allen sitcom Home Improvement.  You can check out tributes I wrote to special holiday episodes by clicking the following links:  Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas

A few years back, I watched reruns of our old favorite, and I noticed that Heidi the Tool Girl wasn't exactly... Heidi.  

Odd, I never noticed that before.  If I did, I was too young to notice or even care.  

It had been years since I rewatched the series, and now it stuck out like a sore thumb.  How could I not have noticed?  

As the episode went on, I realized her name was Lisa.  And Lisa looked awfully familiar, too. 


It was Pamela Anderson!  

How did I not know this?  I pride myself on knowing all sorts of trivia that will never win me anything but a pat on the back, but I have to admit, this escaped me.  I vaguely remembered the Tool Time assistant being different.  Come to think of it, during other watching of reruns over the years, I must have noticed then but not thought anything of it.

I didn't put two-and-two together until that day a few years back, and it's something that I've had a mild curiosity about since.  So, why not look back and see what we can find out about when Pamela Anderson was on Home Improvement!  

This Month In YesterYear History

Monday, April 4, 2022

Here's a fun new topic that I thought I'd try out for the site.  Based on a suggestion I saw on social media, I've decided to take a brief look back at the "best" or "top" of pop culture from 20 (2002), 25 (1997), and 30 (1992) years ago!    


Using film website Box Office Mojo, The Billboard Top 100 music list, and a conglomeration of television rating websites, I've pieced together a little time capsule of what was significant in life during those days.  I'd be happy to run it monthly if you folks like this topic.  As you know, I enjoy researching the past!  

Hopefully, as you read these brief synopses from the past, you'll remember the whens, wheres, and who's of your memories from that time period.  That's what this site is all about, after all!

So, get into those time machines, my friends!  We're headed back to 20, 25, and 30 years ago!

Boy Meets Wrestling: When WWF's Big Van Vader Invaded Boy Meets World

Monday, March 14, 2022

Professional wrestling was a large part of my childhood, as was the story for many kids growing up in the late 80s and early 90s.  Just as important to me back then was making sure I watched the kid-friendly sitcoms on ABC's TGIF on Friday evenings.   


With the WWE's announcement the other day that Vader (Leon White) would be posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame, I spent time reflecting upon his career.  I was first introduced to Vader when he returned to the United States following his mega-star run in New Japan Pro Wrestling in 1990.  As a big fan of World Championship Wrestling (WCW), I first saw Vader sometime in 1990 but really remember him from his match with Stan Hansen at WrestleWar.  He'd then go on to a great run in WCW for a few years as the off-and-on World Champion.  During his time paired with the great former NWA Champion Harley Race, the big man had legendary feuds with my favorites growing up, Ric Flair and Sting.  Sting was already my favorite (still to this day), but his feud with Vader elevated him to new heights in many fans' eyes and cemented his status as World Champion material.

Leon White is often regarded as one of, if not THE, best "big man" in the business.  His high-flying moves from the top rope were unheard of from a man his size both back then and still today.  Standing 6 feet 5 inches and over 450 pounds, the former center for the Los Angeles Rams (1978-1980) moved around the ring like an agile cat but had the size, toughness, and ferocity of a bull.  


He was slated to participate in my favorite match of all time, the 1995 WCW War Games match, but backstage shenanigans got him fired before showing up in the WWF as "The Mastadon," Big Van Vader.  

It was during this time period that one Friday evening I switched the TV over to ABC for my usual TGIF lineup, and on one episode of Boy Meets World, there was the big man himself, Vader!  I remembered Vader having bit parts as the bully's father, but he was all over the place in this episode.  So was Jake "The Snake" Roberts and even "Brother Love" Bruce Prichard!  They had a real WWF show and in-ring action, too!  I was blown away at such a cool cross-over of two things I really enjoyed.

I had really gotten into watching reruns of The Wonder Years on Nick-at-Nite, and when Boy Meets World came along, it was a lighter, funnier, more modern version for kids my age.  As a fun connection between the shows, the star of The Wonder Years, Fred Savage, is the older real-life brother to the star of Boy Meets World, Ben Savage.  

Boy Meets World was a wildly successful family-friendly sitcom from 1993 to 2000.  Starring Ben Savage as Cory Matthews, Rider Strong as Shawn Hunter, William Daniels as Mr. Feeney, Will Friedle as Cory's older brother Eric, and (now famous wrestling fan herself) Danielle Fishel as Topanga.  The show told the story about Cory Matthews and his friends coming of age in the early to mid-90s in a comedic, kid-friendly sitcom.  The show would run until Cory and Topanga were married and in college before returning nearly 15 years later on The Disney Channel as Girl Meets World, centered around Cory and Topanga's daughter.  

At the time, wrestling was still some time away from the culture-changing popularity it would see in the late 90s, but most kids I knew were casual fans of wrestling.  At the time, wrestling and the WWF were full of colorful, larger-than-life comic book characters targeted at children and young teens.  Vader was the perfect comic book character.  An intimidating giant of a man with a gentle soul, he was the ideal fit for a sitcom made for the 16 and under crowd.  

Vader would depart the WWF in 1998 and enter semi-retirement.  After a few more big appearances in Japan and American independent shows, his in-ring career finally came to an end around 2017.  


After years of struggling with his weight, grueling travel schedules, and alcohol abuse, Vader cleaned up his act in 2007.  After becoming a born-again Christian, Vader reconnected with long-time rival (and backstage friend) Sting, another (at the time) recently born-again Christian.  When Vader announced in 2018 he was suffering congestive heart failure and went through multiple surgeries in March of 2018, his good friend Sting (Steve Borden) visited him frequently at the hospital.  

Sadly, Leon passed away on June 18, 2018, following a month-long stay in the hospital with pneumonia.  
 
When Vader and the WWF blended with Boy Meets World and my Friday night sitcom lineup, the result was a very memorable event!  Here's what happened when Big Van Vader, the storied pro wrestler, joined a made-for-kids sitcom in the mid-90s!

10 Sitcoms From the 90s I Still Enjoy

Thursday, January 20, 2022

As my family recovers from the virus that's been making news for the past two years, please excuse the lack of recent articles.  Enjoy this list-style post while I put more effort into my next full-length feature.  

Thank you!

The 1990s was a decade filled with outstanding television programs, including many classics in the sitcom genre.  I've waxed poetic several times on this site about my love for the folksy and occasionally cliched type of television programming.  These days, I would gladly watch a rerun of a sitcom I've seen hundreds of times before than most new shows broadcast today.

Out of the sitcoms that made it to air during the 90s, only a handful of them made it past the first season, let alone into all-time fan favorites.  These sitcoms in the 90s, often geared towards children or families, would endear viewers with funny, emotional, and sometimes educational storylines.  Sometimes the family-friendly series would try to teach us important life lessons.  The series that were meant to entertain adults and teens would do just that; entertain us as we followed along with our favorite characters by peeking into their wacky, crazy everyday life.


Most modern television just doesn't suit me, and I often seek out old programming from my childhood.  As I type this, I'm in a hotel room with the television on in the background.  Playing is an episode of a sitcom I've seen maybe 15 times. 

It's safe and comforting in its familiarity.  It doesn't require any attention, and I can do other things while watching.  It brings back memories of times gone by.

It's television's comfort food.

Join me as I look back on the Top 10 Sitcoms from the 90s that I Still Enjoy watching.  

Christmas on Roseanne

Monday, December 20, 2021

Now that I have a family of my own, the notion of community, tradition, faith, and the holidays mean so much more to me.  "Roseanne" was never a show my family watched when I was growing up, and I didn't get into watching the reruns until I was in college, but the series does an excellent job representing all of those things.  The time period "Roseanne" was set in and the everyday family it portrays really struck a chord with me as it reminded me of my formative years.  It's been a real treat for me to go back and watch and review each season for this "Holidays on Roseanne" series.

The show and the fictional Conner family took the holiday season seriously.  As we found out reviewing the Halloween episodes (CLICK HERE) or Thanksgiving (CLICK HERE), not every season had a dedicated episode to the given holiday.  The same goes for Christmas, and to be honest, I was surprised at the lack of Christmas episodes during its nine-year run.  Even more surprising, it took "Roseanne" four seasons into the series to have their first Christmas-themed episode.  Of the nine seasons in the show's initial run, only 4 episodes involve Christmas.  


Thank you for indulging me these past few months as I review one of my favorite television series from the past.  It has been a lot of fun and has brought back many great memories of hanging around my college dorm watching reruns late at night.  

So without further ado, let's look at how Roseanne, Dan, and the family spent their Christmas holidays with family, food, decorations, and (of course) arguments with "Christmas on Roseanne!"